Are you ready to learn the secret to crocheting all of the stitches?

After you learn how to crochet and get comfortable with a few basics, you’re probably ready to move on and learn even more complex stitch combinations! 

You want to crochet all of the things – I get it!

It’s exciting to see that so many different stitch combinations are possible in crochet, so you may be looking to learn something new like: Shells, Basketweave, Chevron, Wave, Cables, Tunisian, and more.

And so much more, am I right?

In almost every crochet community I’ve seen, crocheters are always asking the same questions about stitches: 

  • How many different crochet stitches are there?
  • What are all of the crochet stitches?
  • What easy or beginner stitches can I learn?

If you’re wondering the same (whether you just started, or you’ve been crocheting for a hundred years) grab some yarn and a hook because you’re about to learn the secret to crocheting any stitch.

Yep, any crochet stitch! 

Learn the basics first

Wait, there’s a secret to crocheting any stitch?

Yes, but it’s not mind-blowingly complicated. 

In fact, it’s elementary.

Have you learned these foundation crochet stitches yet: 

  • Chain
  • Single Crochet
  • Half Double Crochet
  • Double Crochet

If you have, you’re on your way to learning any crochet stitch!

Yes (I keep saying this), any crochet stitch!

You see, in their most basic form, these stitches are the foundation for any other stitch combination and variation in crochet that you can imagine (that’s why they’re called foundation stitches).

When you learn these foundation stitches you’re absolutely ready to try more complex variations – no matter how complex they are!

That’s the secret.

See, it’s elementary and anyone can do it!

But, let’s pause right here for a moment in case you feel underwhelmed…

If you’re thinking that these are too basic to help you learn any other stitch in crochet, this is what it really means to LEARN a stitch:

  • Identifying the basic anatomy of each stitch, individually and among other stitches
  • Counting individual stitches 
  • Counting individual rows of crochet
  • Counting individual rounds of crochet
  • Identifying the right side of a stitch
  • Identifying the wrong side of a stitch 
  • Identifying the right or wrong side of crochet fabric
  • Knowing where to place stitches when working into a chain, row or round.

And, when you have all that down, you should also be able to:

  • Have an even stitch tension
  • Have an even row and round tension
  • Be able to maintain a proper stitch count after each row or round you complete.

And so, LEARNING these stitches means that you can create, identify and count them in a uniform way.

Practice is progress, and your stitching progress leads to the advancement of your crochet skills – including any new stitch you want to try!

Need some resources to brush up on foundation stitches?

Work up a swatch (10 stitches by 10 rows) for each of the following foundation stitches until you’ve leaned them all.  Click on each for a video tutorial: 

For my next piece of advice to work, you’ve got to really LEARN these foundation stitches. So:

  • take your time,
  • document your progress,
  • and don’t skimp on the process.

I promise, the hard work you put into practicing will pay off.

Let’s move on…

Learning how to crochet any stitch

At this point I’m going to assume that you’ve taken time to really LEARN those foundational stitches, and that you’re ready to move on to the next part: Learning how to crochet any stitch!

Earlier, I mentioned that any stitch in crochet is just a combination or variation of foundation crochet stitches. 

That means any stitch or fabric in crochet blends and merges those basic stitches: chain, single, half double, double.

When you think about even the most complex stitches and techniques this way, they may seem more approachable!

If you still aren’t entirely sure what all this means, let’s put it into practice by reviewing a few different stitches together.

Example 1: Linen Crochet Stitch

This texture is created with: Chain, Single.

That is it!

Chains and single crochet stitches alternate and repeat within a row, and then the opposite repeat is worked into the following row.

Give it a try:

Example 2: Sedge Crochet Stitch

This texture is created with: Chain, Single, Half Double, Double.

That is it!

Groups of individual stitches are placed together into one stitch, then a few stitches are skipped to maintain the same stitch count.

Give it a try:

Example 3: Simple Wave Crochet Stitch

This texture is created with: Chain, Single, Double.

That is it!

Groups of individual stitches are placed into one stitch (5 double crochet), then stitches are skipped, creating the rises and falls (waves) in the fabric.

Instead of saying “work 5 double crochet into 1 stitch”, a pattern might give this grouping a name (Shell), and define it on the cover page of the pattern under “Specialty Stitches & Techniques”; When you see “Shell” in the pattern instructions, you know what to do!

Give it a try:

Example 4: Waffle Crochet Stitch

This texture is created with: Chain, Double.

That is it!

Unless otherwise specified, we work stitches into the tops of stitches in the previous row (round).

When stitches are worked around the posts of stitches within the previous row (or round), we call these post stitches (a specialty stitch or technique).

While you are creating a double crochet stitch, the instructions for the placement can be lengthy, therefore, the “Specialty Stitch & Technique” section on the cover page may reference “FPdc” with a definition on how to work (and where to place) this stitch; when you see “FPdc” in the pattern instructions, you know what to do!

Give it a try:

Example 5: Cable Towers Crochet Stitch

This texture is created with: Chain, Half Double, Double.

That is it!

When double crochet stitches are worked around the posts of stitches within the previous row, we now know they are called post stitches.

To create that twisted looking cable, you’ll skip over stitches before you place your post stitches.

While you are creating a double crochet stitch, the instructions for the placement can be lengthy, therefore, the “Specialty Stitch & Techniques” section on the cover page may reference “FPdc” with a definition on how to work, and where to place, this stitch; when you see “FPdc” in the pattern instructions, you know what to do, but also pay close attention to where it will be placed (skipping ahead, or behind, the current stitch)!

Give it a try:

Ready to try more than 30 classic and unique crochet stitches?

Click Here to share your new stitch skills in our community!

Peace + Love + Crochet

Salena

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2 Comments

  1. Becky Enyart says:

    What a fantastic encouraging article. Your so right!! It has put the foundation stitches in a much more simplistic way of understanding the ‘basics’. I am so ready to start practicing. I’ll try and post in our amazing group.

    1. Thank you for reading this article! I’m so glad you found this valuable, and I look forward to seeing what you create next – keep us posted, especially in the group!

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